Dentist - Kenosha
3600 80th Street
Kenosha, WI 53142
P:262-697-5444, F:262-694-1650
E-mail [email protected]

 

Archive:

Tags

face myspacce blog twitter



nobel_biocare

 

Posts for: May, 2022

By Josephine Chianello Berman, D.D.S.
May 20, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   braces  
SNLStarsToothGapHasApparentlyVanishedAndSoCanYours

For all you hardcore Saturday Night Live fans, here's a trivia question: Who was the first cast member born in the 1990s? The answer—Pete Davidson, the edgy young comic who joined in 2014 at age 20. Speaking of Davidson, here's another question: What happened to his tooth gap?

If you're a dedicated viewer, you may have noticed in his early SNL seasons that Davidson had a noticeable gap between his front teeth, as well as some overall unevenness. Recently, though, the gap seems to have vanished and his teeth look straighter. As gossip goes, some believe his recent relationship with Kim Kardashian may be behind any dental changes.

So, what happened? Well, we're not sure! Davidson hasn't dished on any dental work. We'll just have to speculate and we do have a few possibilities.

First, though, it's helpful to understand what causes tooth gaps. In some cases, the size of a person's tooth might be too small in proportion to their jaw, which can leave space between teeth.

A gap can also develop if the strap of tissue connecting the upper lip to the gums (labial frenum) is overly large. Problems during childhood like an abnormal swallowing pattern or thumb sucking that put pressure on upper front teeth to move outward can create a gap.

Knowing the underlying cause can help us determine the best approach to correcting a tooth gap. Here a few of them.

Orthodontics. If a poor bite has created the gap, correcting the bite can close it. In this instance, we may turn to braces, aligners, or other orthodontic devices for moving teeth.

Dental bonding. With this technique, we apply a composite dental material to the tooth surface and bond it in place. This method is often used to repair chips, cracks or, in this case, fill in a slight gap.

Veneers. These thin shells of dental porcelain are bonded to the face of teeth to mask dental defects. Depending on how wide it is, a tooth gap could fall into this category.

Crowns. A step up from veneers, porcelain crowns are cemented over small-sized teeth to completely cover them.  Crowns could alleviate a gap by improving the proportional size of teeth.

One other thing to note: It may be possible to avoid a gap altogether by addressing causative issues in childhood. A simple frenectomy—snipping the tissue of an overly large labial frenum—or cessation therapy for thumb sucking could prevent a gap from developing.

But if that ship has already sailed, we may still be able to address your tooth gap and improve your smile. An initial consultative exam is your first step to a more attractive, gap-free smile.

If you would like more information about tooth gaps and how to treat them, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Space Between Front Teeth.”


By Josephine Chianello Berman, D.D.S.
May 10, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: partial denture  
ThisTemporaryRPDCouldSustainYourSmileWhileYouWaitForImplants

Dental implants are often the ideal choice to replace missing teeth. Unfortunately, "ideal" and "affordable" don't always align simultaneously for people. Even if implants are right for you, you may have to put them off to a more financially appropriate season.

In the meantime, though, you're still missing teeth—and perhaps some of them are right square in the middle of your smile. What can you do now, even if temporarily?

The solution might be a flexible removable partial denture (RPD). These newer types of RPD fit somewhere between the lightweight "flipper" and the more traditional rigid plastic appliances often made for permanent use. The flexible RPD is made of nylon plastic (technically known as a super-polyamide), which although lightweight, is highly durable.

Super-polyamides change their shape under high heat, a characteristic dental technicians take advantage of by injection molding heated material into flexible denture bases, to which they then attach the replacement teeth. Like other RPDs, a flexible RPD is custom-designed for the individual patient to match their jaw contours, as well as the types and locations of their missing teeth.

Flexible RPDs also differ from other RPD types in how they stay in place. While the more rigid RPD depends on metal clasps that grip to some of the remaining natural teeth, a flexible RPD uses finger-like extensions of the nylon material to fit around teeth near the gum line where they're difficult to see. As such, the flexible RPD is both comfortable and securely held in place.

A flexible RPD, like their counterparts, does require regular maintenance. Any RPD can accumulate dental plaque, a thin biofilm buildup on teeth that causes dental disease. For this reason, wearers should regularly remove their RPD and clean it thoroughly with an antibacterial soap (never toothpaste). All RPDs should also be removed at night to limit bacterial growth.

With a little care, a flexible RPD could last for several years. It could be just the solution to buy you time while you're waiting to obtain dental implants.

If you would like more information on restoration options for missing teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Flexible Partial Dentures.”